SHOWER
                     TODAY
                               MAYBE?
           EXCHANGE
                     CLOTHES?

          SHOWER

                    TODAY

                              MAYBE?

          EXCHANGE

                    CLOTHES?

(Source: clintonfbarton)

beanclam:

Super sketchy, but I’ll post these anyway. Getting in on the Sailor Moon redesign party. 

I’m going for the superhero/Gatchaman thing…

zuky:

zuky:

(via so-treu)(via zenlavie)
This is Anna May Wong, whom I wrote about on my old blog. Unfortunately the video clip is gone because, ahem, my YouTube account was deleted for repeated terms of use violations (hey I said I was a renegade), but here’s the text:

Anna May Wong catapulted to international fame in 1924, at the age of 19, when she appeared in the Hollywood megaproduction The Thief of Baghdad in a scandalously skimpy exotic costume with Douglas Fairbanks menacingly poking a sword at her bare back. She called herself “the woman of a thousand deaths” because her onscreen characters — prostitutes, dragon ladies, jilted lovers — inevitably died. These were the kinds of concessions to racism, misogyny, and colonialism which Wong had to make in order to flourish in Hollywood; so she made them, and she certainly flourished.
Her story is (fairly) well-known, but Bill Moyers does as good a job retelling it as I’ve seen, in this fifth part of our series. Wong occupied an in-between cultural-historical space whose internal tensions could not possibly be reconciled. Whites were happy to view Wong as a mesmerizing symbol of the Orient (Eric Maschwitz wrote the pop standard "These Foolish Things" about her), while Chinese folks were often torn about what she represented: some lauded her groundbreaking success, others decried the racist depictions she appeared to serve. She never married; her chances at finding a (Chinese American) match in her high-flying showbiz world were nil; she had flings with (white) producers and leading men, but obviously none could last. Wong’s life is often viewed through the lens of tragedy; yet perhaps this is yet another slight against a woman who forcefully, fearlessly pushed her way into the top tier of American glamour and used not only her body but her mind and her voice to shine an unprecedented light on the Chinese American experience.

zuky:

zuky:

(via so-treu)(via zenlavie)

This is Anna May Wong, whom I wrote about on my old blog. Unfortunately the video clip is gone because, ahem, my YouTube account was deleted for repeated terms of use violations (hey I said I was a renegade), but here’s the text:

Anna May Wong catapulted to international fame in 1924, at the age of 19, when she appeared in the Hollywood megaproduction The Thief of Baghdad in a scandalously skimpy exotic costume with Douglas Fairbanks menacingly poking a sword at her bare back. She called herself “the woman of a thousand deaths” because her onscreen characters — prostitutes, dragon ladies, jilted lovers — inevitably died. These were the kinds of concessions to racism, misogyny, and colonialism which Wong had to make in order to flourish in Hollywood; so she made them, and she certainly flourished.

Her story is (fairly) well-known, but Bill Moyers does as good a job retelling it as I’ve seen, in this fifth part of our series. Wong occupied an in-between cultural-historical space whose internal tensions could not possibly be reconciled. Whites were happy to view Wong as a mesmerizing symbol of the Orient (Eric Maschwitz wrote the pop standard "These Foolish Things" about her), while Chinese folks were often torn about what she represented: some lauded her groundbreaking success, others decried the racist depictions she appeared to serve. She never married; her chances at finding a (Chinese American) match in her high-flying showbiz world were nil; she had flings with (white) producers and leading men, but obviously none could last. Wong’s life is often viewed through the lens of tragedy; yet perhaps this is yet another slight against a woman who forcefully, fearlessly pushed her way into the top tier of American glamour and used not only her body but her mind and her voice to shine an unprecedented light on the Chinese American experience.

zuky:

zuky:

This is a caravan of 500 Chinese Mexicans, fleeing from Mexico to the US in 1917, in an episode of North American history that is all but forgotten, part of a social phenomenon known at the time as el movimiento antichino. In the early 1900s, Chinese Exclusion Laws were in full effect in the US. Many Chinese laborers and merchants had settled on the Mexican side of the southern US border. These Chinese were targeted in a brutal ethnic cleansing campaign led by Mexican revolutionaries such as Pancho Villa. The purported rationale for this xenophobia was that the Chinese were taking Mexican jobs. Some theorists believe that anti-Chinese sentiment was a key component in the creation of a racialized Mexican national identity. Hundreds of Chinese were murdered, thousands were put on ships back to China (often with Mexican wives).
In 1916, US General John J. Pershing led 10,000 troops across the Mexican border on a mission to hunt down and kill Pancho Villa. He sought and received field assistance from certain Chinese communities in northern Mexico. Chinese restaurants and laundromats fed and clothed Pershing’s troops. In the end, the mission failed and Pancho Villa got away. For the Chinese who had aided Pershing, staying in Mexico was probably unwise. Pershing received a special exception to Chinese Exclusion Laws from the US president himself, and brought a bedraggled column of 500 Chinese refugees into the US southwest in 1917.


My great grandfather was Chinese-Mexican and I never knew about this…

zuky:

zuky:

This is a caravan of 500 Chinese Mexicans, fleeing from Mexico to the US in 1917, in an episode of North American history that is all but forgotten, part of a social phenomenon known at the time as el movimiento antichino. In the early 1900s, Chinese Exclusion Laws were in full effect in the US. Many Chinese laborers and merchants had settled on the Mexican side of the southern US border. These Chinese were targeted in a brutal ethnic cleansing campaign led by Mexican revolutionaries such as Pancho Villa. The purported rationale for this xenophobia was that the Chinese were taking Mexican jobs. Some theorists believe that anti-Chinese sentiment was a key component in the creation of a racialized Mexican national identity. Hundreds of Chinese were murdered, thousands were put on ships back to China (often with Mexican wives).

In 1916, US General John J. Pershing led 10,000 troops across the Mexican border on a mission to hunt down and kill Pancho Villa. He sought and received field assistance from certain Chinese communities in northern Mexico. Chinese restaurants and laundromats fed and clothed Pershing’s troops. In the end, the mission failed and Pancho Villa got away. For the Chinese who had aided Pershing, staying in Mexico was probably unwise. Pershing received a special exception to Chinese Exclusion Laws from the US president himself, and brought a bedraggled column of 500 Chinese refugees into the US southwest in 1917.

My great grandfather was Chinese-Mexican and I never knew about this…

bigmamag:

Whenever I come across people who say that Gimli/Legolas is a weird pairing because Gimli isn’t cute, I have a mental image of Legolas as Fleur Delacour telling them off. “I am good-looking enough for both of us, I theenk!”

gingerhaze:

I’m sorry. I love you.

gingerhaze:

I’m sorry. I love you.

zuky:

This innocent-looking house is believed to be the only Chinese home to survive the Rock Springs Massacre in 1885. At that time, more than 300 Chinese miners were living in 80 houses in Rock Springs, Wyoming, when a white mob went on a rampage, murdering and mutilating an unknown number of Chinese people (at least dozens, probably hundreds), torching 79 homes, throwing corpses into the fires and burning some people who could not escape alive.
This photo comes from a new online project called No Place For Your Kind (via Angry Asian Man), which aims to photograph and document contemporary locations where anti-Chinese violence took place in the late 19th and early 20th centuries as part of a campaign of ethnic cleansing against the Chinese in America. According to the site:

From 1870 to 1910 a violent anti-Chinese movement in this country instigated forced removals of entire Chinese communities, major riots against Chinese residents and even horrific massacres of Chinese immigrants. Some of these actions, such the riot in Rock Springs, Wyoming, were among the most violent events in American history, yet few people are aware of this part of our American culture.
Photographer Tim Greyhavens has spent more than five years researching and documenting the exact locations of many of these events, tracing the history of the past to the landscapes of today. Unlike many historical sites, there has been little recognition of the specific places where these events took place. For most sites there are no plaques or markers, no guidebook references – nothing at all to indicate what happened. Greyhavens has recorded these seemingly commonplace scenes and combined them with written descriptions of what took place there. The photographs and the text together are integral parts of the documentation for this project.

zuky:

This innocent-looking house is believed to be the only Chinese home to survive the Rock Springs Massacre in 1885. At that time, more than 300 Chinese miners were living in 80 houses in Rock Springs, Wyoming, when a white mob went on a rampage, murdering and mutilating an unknown number of Chinese people (at least dozens, probably hundreds), torching 79 homes, throwing corpses into the fires and burning some people who could not escape alive.

This photo comes from a new online project called No Place For Your Kind (via Angry Asian Man), which aims to photograph and document contemporary locations where anti-Chinese violence took place in the late 19th and early 20th centuries as part of a campaign of ethnic cleansing against the Chinese in America. According to the site:

From 1870 to 1910 a violent anti-Chinese movement in this country instigated forced removals of entire Chinese communities, major riots against Chinese residents and even horrific massacres of Chinese immigrants. Some of these actions, such the riot in Rock Springs, Wyoming, were among the most violent events in American history, yet few people are aware of this part of our American culture.

Photographer Tim Greyhavens has spent more than five years researching and documenting the exact locations of many of these events, tracing the history of the past to the landscapes of today. Unlike many historical sites, there has been little recognition of the specific places where these events took place. For most sites there are no plaques or markers, no guidebook references – nothing at all to indicate what happened. Greyhavens has recorded these seemingly commonplace scenes and combined them with written descriptions of what took place there. The photographs and the text together are integral parts of the documentation for this project.

“One of the most durable paradoxes of white supremacy - the idea that those who are closest to an experience of oppression are its least credible witnesses.”

Walter Johnson, Soul by soul: life inside the antebellum slave market
(via drapetomaniakkk)

This is the type of violence—from microaggressions to epistemic violence to emotional/physical violence to enslavement/genocide—that gets justified by asserting that the oppressor is “objective” and “logical” and thereby “credible.” As if there is objectivity in choosing to oppress. As if the emotions of entitlement, indifference, greed or hatred aren’t involved. 

(via gradientlair)

(Source: guitarbains)

“The Chinese are inhabitants of another planet. Machine like. They are automatic engines of flesh and blood. Why not discriminate? Why aid in the increase and distribution over our domain of a degraded and inferior race, and the progenitors of an inferior sort of men. We ask you to secure us American Anglo-Saxon civilization without contamination or adulteration. Let us keep pure the blood which circulates through our political system. And preserve our life from the gangrene of oriental civilization.”

Senator John F. Miller (R-CA) on the US Senate floor in 1881, advocating for the Chinese Exclusion Act. The New York Times called Miller’s two-hour speech “a mastery statement, admirable in temper and judicial in fairness”. (via zuky)

The first Chinese Exclusion Act was passed by Congress and signed into law by President Chester A. Arthur the following year, in 1882. The law was written to last for 10 years; in 1892, it was renewed for another 10 year; and in 1902, Chinese Exclusion was made permanent.

  • Male author: I guess women are people
  • Fans: I CAN'T STOP CRYING, THIS IS WHAT A FEMINIST LOOKS LIKE!